Orthodoxy Concluded!

In Orthodoxy Chesterton has charted for us his 'own growth in spiritual certainty'. In this final chapter he gives assurance that this path was firmly based on rational considerations, which at first fly in the face of the rationalist's 'reasons', but on a closer look are really quite reasonable. But the best bit of reading Chesterton, … Continue reading Orthodoxy Concluded!

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The Huge Synthesis of Humbug!

All modern philosophies are chains which connect and fetter; Christianity is a sword which separates and sets free.  No other philosophy makes God actually rejoice in the separation of the universe into living souls. p.200 Chesterton was a brilliant philosophiser with a quirky way of saying things. His witty remarks redeem for me the hard … Continue reading The Huge Synthesis of Humbug!

Creativity and the Christian

C.S. Lewis provides a Biblical perspective and critique of modern literary criticism. Though this address was first delivered in 1939, Lewis' unease with the key concepts of literary tradition—namely self-expression, creativity, spontaneity and freedom from rules—is at least as pertinent today as it was in his time. To be 'yourself' is one of the highest … Continue reading Creativity and the Christian

G.K. on “The Sin of Self-Confidence”

"Complete self-confidence is not merely a sin; complete self-confidence is a weakness.  Believing utterly in one's self is a hysterical and superstitious belief like believing in Joanna Southcote." --G.K. Chesterton, Orthodoxy, p.10 [Southcote was a self-proclaimed but deluded prophetess in late eighteenth century England]. When asked by a publisher friend: "Well, if a man is … Continue reading G.K. on “The Sin of Self-Confidence”